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Keto diet and diabetes

by Development PRT on 0 Comments

Keto diet 

Because special diets for type 2 diabetes frequently focus on weight loss, it may appear strange that a high-fat diet is an option. The ketogenic (keto) diet, which is high in fat and low in carbohydrates, has the potential to modify the way your body stores and utilises energy, thereby alleviating diabetic symptoms.

With the keto diet, your body converts fat into energy rather than sugar. The diet was developed in the 1920s as a therapy for epilepsy, but its effects on type 2 diabetes are currently being explored.

The ketogenic diet may enhance blood glucose (sugar) levels while decreasing insulin requirements. The diet, however, is not without hazards. Before making substantial dietary changes, consult with your doctor.

Keto diet high in fat 

Because many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, a high-fat diet may appear counterproductive.

The ketogenic diet's purpose is to make the body use fat for energy rather than carbs or glucose. The keto diet provides the majority of your energy from fat, with relatively little from carbs.

However, the ketogenic diet does not imply a high intake of saturated fats. Heart-healthy lipids are essential for general wellness. Healthy foods typically consumed on the ketogenic diet include:

  • eggs
  • fish such as salmon
  • cottage cheese
  • avocado
  • olives and olive oil
  • nuts and nut butters
  • seeds

Blood glucose effects

The ketogenic diet has the ability to lower blood glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes are often advised to limit their carbohydrate intake because carbohydrates convert to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes.

Carbohydrate counts, on the other hand, should be calculated on an individual basis with the assistance of your doctor.

Eating too many carbohydrates might be problematic if you already have high blood glucose levels. Some people notice lower blood sugar levels when they shift their emphasis to fat.

Diabetes and the Atkins Diet

The Atkins diet is a well-known low-carb, high-protein diet that is frequently connected with the keto diet. However, there are some significant differences between the two diets.

In the 1970s, Dr. Robert C. Atkins developed the Atkins diet. It's frequently advertised as a means to lose weight while simultaneously controlling a variety of health conditions, including type 2 diabetes.

While reducing excess carbs is a positive step, it is unclear whether this diet alone can help diabetes. Weight reduction of any sort, whether through the Atkins diet or another program, is helpful for diabetes and high blood sugar levels.

The Atkins diet, unlike the keto diet, does not always support greater fat consumption. Nonetheless, you could increase your fat intake by limiting

The disadvantages are comparable.

Aside from a high saturated fat intake, carbohydrate restriction may result in low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. This is especially true if you take insulin-inducing drugs and do not modify your dosage.

Cutting carbohydrates on the Atkins diet may help you lose weight and regulate diabetic symptoms. There aren't enough data, however, to demonstrate that Atkins and diabetes control go hand in hand.

Drawback 

When you switch your body's primary energy source from carbohydrates to fat, your blood ketones rise. This "dietary ketosis" is distinct from ketoacidosis, which is a potentially fatal illness.

When you have an excess of ketones, you may develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is most common in type 1 diabetes when blood glucose levels are excessively high and can be caused by a lack of insulin.

Although DKA is uncommon in type 2 diabetes, it is possible if ketones are too high. Being sick while on a low-carb diet may also raise your risk of DKA.

If you're following a ketogenic diet, check your blood sugar levels throughout the day to ensure they're within the ideal range. Consider checking your ketone levels to ensure you are not at danger for DKA.

If your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL, the American Diabetes Association suggests testing for ketones. Urine strips can be used to test at home.

DKA is considered a medical emergency. Consult your doctor right away if you are experiencing DKA symptoms. Diabetic coma can result from complications.

The following are symptoms of DKA:

  • consistently high blood sugar
  • dry mouth
  • frequent urination
  • nausea
  • breath that has a fruit-like odour
  • breathing difficulties

Monitoring your diabetes

The ketogenic diet appears to be simple. A high-fat diet, on the other hand, need rigorous supervision, as opposed to a regular low-calorie diet. In fact, you may begin the diet in a hospital.

To ensure that the diet isn't having any detrimental consequences, your doctor should check both blood glucose and ketone levels. You may still need to see your doctor once or twice a month once your body has adjusted to the diet for testing and prescription changes.

Even if your symptoms improve, it is critical to maintain frequent blood glucose monitoring. The frequency of type 2 diabetes testing varies. Check with your doctor to decide the appropriate testing plan for your specific case.

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