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Ulcerative Colitis: Essential Terminology

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Living with ulcerative colitis can be challenging, especially when faced with complex medical terms and jargon. To help you navigate the world of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and better understand ulcerative colitis, we have compiled a list of important words and phrases commonly associated with the condition. Whether you are a patient, caregiver, or simply interested in learning more, this comprehensive glossary will provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge.

Autoimmune Disease: A condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy cells and tissues, leading to inflammation and other symptoms.

Bifidobacterium: A type of probiotic bacteria that can be beneficial in alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is often found in certain dairy products.

Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR or SED Rate): A blood test that indirectly measures the level of inflammation in the body.

Fistula: An abnormal connection or tunnel that forms between two organs, vessels, or intestines. Fistulas can cause pain, discomfort, and infections.

Biopsy: A medical procedure in which a small sample of tissue is removed for further examination, usually to determine the presence of a disease or condition.

Aminosalicylates: A group of medications commonly used to treat inflammation of the gut and inflammatory bowel disease. They are also effective in managing flare-ups of ulcerative colitis.

Back Gas: Slang term used to describe the accumulation of gas in a stoma pouch, causing it to expand.

Bacterial Recolonization: The process of reintroducing beneficial bacteria into the gut to manage symptoms of colitis.

Barium Enema: An X-ray examination that helps doctors detect changes or abnormalities in the large intestine.

Bloating: The sensation of increased pressure and fullness in the abdomen due to the buildup of gas in the stomach and intestines.

Clench Up: The act of squeezing the rectum together to prevent leakage.

Crohn's Disease: A chronic inflammatory condition that can affect any part of the digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, bloody stools, and the development of ulcers.

Crohnie: A term used to refer to an individual who has Crohn's disease.

Colectomy: A surgical procedure that involves the partial or complete removal of the large intestine (colon).

Colon: The final segment of the digestive tract, also known as the large intestine.

Colonoscopy: A diagnostic procedure that allows doctors to examine the inside of the colon and rectum using a flexible, lighted tube with a camera.

Computed Tomography (CT) Scan: An imaging technique that combines X-ray views from different angles to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body's bones and soft tissues.

Constipation: Difficulty in passing stools, often characterized by hardened feces and infrequent bowel movements.

Digital Rectal Exam: A procedure in which a healthcare provider examines the rectum with a gloved finger to check for Piles, polyps, or tumors.

Distal Colitis: A term used to describe forms of ulcerative colitis that involve inflammation in the rectum and the left side of the colon.

Diverticulitis: Inflammation and infection of small outpouchings (diverticula) in the colon, often causing abdominal pain and discomfort. The condition is known as diverticulosis when not inflamed.

Diverticulum: A hollow or fluid-filled pouch or structure that protrudes from the wall of an organ.

Endoscopy: A procedure in which a healthcare provider uses an endoscope, a lighted instrument with a camera, to examine the inside of the digestive tract. Endoscopy helps in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of various conditions affecting the gastrointestinal (GI) system.

Flare or Flare-up: The sudden onset or worsening of symptoms associated with a particular disease or condition, such as ulcerative colitis.

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy: A procedure that allows doctors to visualize the rectum and the lower portion of the colon using a flexible tube with a camera.

Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract: The large organ system responsible for the consumption, digestion, absorption of nutrients, and elimination of waste, extending from the mouth to the anus.

Piles: Swollen and inflamed veins in the rectum and around the anus. Pilescan cause pain, itching, and bleeding when irritated.

"Wet Fart": A colloquial term used to describe the accidental passing of gas along with solid waste. It is also known as a "shart."

Ulcers: Open sores or lesions that develop on the lining of the colon or other parts of the body.

Ulcerative Proctitis: A form of ulcerative colitis characterized by inflammation limited to the rectum.

Ulceration: The formation or development of ulcers, which are open sores on the surface of tissues.

Toxic Megacolon: A life-threatening complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis. It refers to a sudden dilation or widening of the large intestine, leading to its dysfunction. Immediate medical attention and hospitalization are necessary for treatment.

Total Proctocolectomy: A surgical procedure involving the complete removal of the large intestine and rectum.

Tenesmus: The persistent feeling of needing to empty the bowels, accompanied by involuntary straining efforts, pain, and cramping, often with little or no fecal output. Tenesmus is sometimes mistaken for constipation.

Stool Analysis: A series of tests conducted on a stool (feces) sample to aid in the diagnosis of specific conditions affecting the digestive tract.

Immune System: The body's defense mechanism against infectious organisms and other foreign substances.

Stoma Bag: Another term for a colostomy bag, which is used to collect waste from a surgically created opening (stoma) in the abdomen.

Inflammation: The swelling, irritation, or pain in the body's tissues, often resulting from the immune system's response to injury or infection.

Spastic Colon: An alternative name for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common digestive disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habits.

Sigmoid Colon: The S-shaped segment of the large intestine located between the descending colon and the rectum.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A group of chronic inflammatory conditions that affect the gastrointestinal tract, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

Shart: A slang term referring to the accidental passing of gas along with solid waste. It is similar to a "wet fart."

Intestine: The portion of the gastrointestinal tract that transports food and waste from the stomach to the rectum. It consists of the small intestine and the large intestine (colon).

Remission: A period during which a chronic disease, such as ulcerative colitis, shows no active symptoms or signs of disease activity.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): A diagnostic imaging technique that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the body's soft tissues and bones.

Rectum: The lower section of the large intestine that connects the sigmoid colon to the anus.

Pan-ulcerative (Total) Colitis: A type of ulcerative colitis that affects the entire colon. It can lead to severe complications, such as massive bleeding and acute dilation of the colon which may result in a perforation or opening in the bowel wall.

Rectal Urgency: The sudden and urgent need to have a bowel movement, often accompanied by a sense of immediate and intense pressure.

Polyp: An abnormal growth that develops in the lining of the intestine, which can be noncancerous, precancerous, or cancerous. Polyps are often removed during a colonoscopy procedure.

Proctitis: Inflammation of the lining of the rectum and anus, leading to symptoms such as rectal pain, bleeding, and discomfort.

Probiotics: Live bacteria and yeast that contribute to the healthy balance of bacteria in the colon. They are naturally found in the body and can also be consumed through supplements and certain foods like yogurt and kefir.

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects the large intestine (colon) and rectum, causing inflammation and the formation of ulcers or sores in the colon lining. It typically starts in the rectum and spreads upward. While it primarily affects the colon, it rarely affects the small intestine beyond the lower portion.

Living with ulcerative colitis can be challenging, but understanding the key terms associated with the condition can help you navigate through the complexities. Autoimmune disease refers to a condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy cells and tissues, leading to inflammation and damage.

Bifidobacterium, a probiotic found in certain dairy products, may provide some relief from symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcerative colitis. These beneficial bacteria help maintain a healthy balance in the gut.

When evaluating ulcerative colitis, healthcare providers may use the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or SED rate) test, which indirectly measures the level of inflammation in the body. A higher rate indicates more significant inflammation.

Fistulas are abnormal connections or tunnels that form between organs, vessels, or intestines, often causing pain, discomfort, and the risk of infection. Biopsies, on the other hand, involve the removal of a small tissue sample for further examination to gain insights into a disease or condition.

Aminosalicylates are a group of medications used to treat gut inflammation and inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcerative colitis. They are also effective in preventing flare-ups.

Gas buildup in the stoma pouch, known as back gas, can cause the pouch to expand. Bacterial recolonization is a process where bacteria are reintroduced or increased to manage colitis symptoms.

To detect changes or abnormalities in the large intestine, doctors may recommend a barium enema, an X-ray exam using a contrast material. Bloating refers to the discomfort caused by gas accumulation in the stomach and intestines, leading to intermittent abdominal distension.

When experiencing rectal leakage, clenching up helps to squeeze the rectum together and prevent further leakage. Crohn's disease, another form of inflammatory bowel disease, affects the entire digestive tract and presents symptoms such as diarrhea, cramping, bloody stools, and ulcers.

Someone who has Crohn's disease is often referred to as a Crohnie. In severe cases of ulcerative colitis, a colectomy may be necessary, involving the partial or complete removal of the large intestine through surgery.

The colon, also known as the large intestine, is the final segment of the digestive tract. A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows doctors to examine the inside of the colon and rectum using a long, flexible, lighted tube equipped with a tiny video camera.

Computed tomography (CT) scans use X-ray views from different angles to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body's bones and soft tissues. Constipation, on the other hand refers to the difficulty or trouble in emptying the bowels, often caused by hardened feces. It is a common symptom experienced by individuals with ulcerative colitis.

A digital rectal exam, typically associated with prostate exams in men, can also be used to examine the rectum for signs of Piles, polyps, or tumors. Distal colitis is a term used to describe forms of ulcerative colitis that specifically involve inflammation in the rectum and the left colon, up to the mid-portion of the descending colon.

Diverticulitis is a condition characterized by inflammation and infection of small outpouchings called diverticula in the colon. When the diverticula are not inflamed, the condition is known as diverticulosis. Endoscopy is a procedure in which a healthcare provider uses an endoscope, a lighted instrument with a camera, to visually examine and treat certain conditions within the digestive system.

Flare or flare-up refers to the sudden appearance or worsening of symptoms associated with ulcerative colitis. During a flare, individuals may experience increased inflammation, pain, diarrhea, and other related symptoms.

A flexible sigmoidoscopy is a procedure that allows doctors to examine the rectum and the lower part of the colon using a flexible, lighted camera. It is a useful diagnostic tool for evaluating the extent and severity of ulcerative colitis.

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a vital organ system responsible for the consumption, digestion, absorption of nutrients, and elimination of waste. It spans from the mouth to the anus and plays a crucial role in maintaining overall health.

Pilesare swollen and inflamed veins within the rectum and around the anus. They can cause pain, itching, and bleeding, especially when aggravated.

The term "wet fart" is a slang term used to describe the passage of gas along with solid waste, often associated with episodes of incontinence. It is similar to the term "shart."

Ulcers are open sores that can develop in the lining of the colon in individuals with ulcerative colitis. Ulcerative proctitis specifically refers to the form of ulcerative colitis that affects only the rectum.

Ulceration refers to the formation or development of ulcers. It is a characteristic feature of ulcerative colitis, causing damage to the lining of the colon.

Toxic megacolon is a severe and life-threatening complication associated with inflammatory bowel diseases like ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by a sudden dilation or widening of the colon, making it ineffective in its normal functioning. Immediate medical attention and hospitalization are required for treatment.

Total proctocolectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the complete removal of the large bowel (colon) and the rectum. It is sometimes necessary in cases of severe ulcerative colitis that do not respond to other treatments.

Tenesmus is a term used to describe the constant feeling of needing to empty the bowel, accompanied by involuntary straining efforts, pain, and cramping, even with little or no fecal output. It is a symptom often mistaken for constipation.

Stool analysis involves a series of tests performed on a feces (stool) sample to assist in the diagnosis of certain conditions affecting the digestive tract, including ulcerative colitis.

The immune system plays a crucial role in defending the body against infectious organisms and other invaders. In the case of ulcerative colitis, the immune system mistakenly triggers inflammation in the colon and rectum.

A stoma bag, also known as a colostomy bag, is a pouch attached to the abdomen to collect waste from the intestines in individuals who have undergone certain surgical procedures, such as a colostomy.

Inflammation refers to the swollen, irritated, or painful tissue anywhere in the body. In the context of ulcerative colitis, inflammation occurs in the lining of the colon and rectum, leading to the characteristic symptoms and complications of the disease.

Spastic colon is another term used to describe a common condition known as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is characterized by abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, and changes in bowel habits without evidence of structural damage or inflammation.

The sigmoid colon is the S-shaped curve of the lower part of the large intestine that connects the descending colon to the rectum. It is a common site of inflammation and ulceration in individuals with ulcerative colitis.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It includes conditions like ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. These conditions involve abnormal immune responses and inflammation in the GI tract.

"Shart" is a slang term that refers to the accidental passing of gas along with solid waste. It is similar to the term "wet fart" and can be embarrassing and uncomfortable.

The intestine is a crucial part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract responsible for carrying food and waste from the stomach to the rectum. It consists of the small intestine and the large intestine (colon).

Remission in the context of ulcerative colitis refers to the absence of chronic disease activity within a patient. It is a period when the symptoms are minimal or nonexistent, and the inflammation in the colon is under control.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic technique that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of the body's soft tissues and bones. It can be helpful in visualizing the extent and severity of inflammation in the colon and rectum in individuals with ulcerative colitis.

The rectum is the lower section of the large intestine, located just above the anus. It serves as a temporary storage site for feces before elimination.

Pan-ulcerative (total) colitis is a type of ulcerative colitis that affects the entire colon. It can be a severe form of the disease and may lead to complications such as massive bleeding or acute dilation of the colon, requiring immediate medical attention.

Rectal urgency is the sudden and intense need to have a bowel movement. It is a common symptom experienced by individuals with ulcerative colitis and can be accompanied by abdominal pain and cramping.

A polyp is a growth in the intestinal lining that can be noncancerous (benign), precancerous, or cancerous. During a colonoscopy, doctors may detect and remove polyps to reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Proctitis is the inflammation of the anus and the lining of the rectum. It is a form of ulcerative colitis that specifically affects the rectum.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeast that contribute to the beneficial bacteria present in the colon. They can be found naturally in the body and are also available in the form of supplements and foods like yogurt and kefir. Probiotics may help improve gut health and alleviate some symptoms of ulcerative colitis.

Understanding these terms is essential for individuals with ulcerative colitis and their caregivers. It allows for better communication with healthcare providers, facilitates informed decision-making, and promotes active participation in managing the disease.

In conclusion, ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease characterized by inflammation and ulcers in the colon and rectum. Familiarizing oneself with the terminology associated with the condition empowers individuals to navigate their journey with ulcerative colitis more effectively. From autoimmune disease and biopsy to inflammation and probiotics, each term plays a role in understanding and addressing the various aspects of this chronic condition. By staying informed and engaged, individuals can work collaboratively with their healthcare team to develop effective strategies for managing symptoms, reducing inflammation, and improving their overall quality of life.

Autoimmune disease is a condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy cells and tissues. Ulcerative colitis is classified as an autoimmune disease because the immune system triggers inflammation in the colon and rectum.

Bifidobacterium is a type of probiotic that has shown potential in easing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis. Probiotics, such as Bifidobacterium, can be found in certain dairy products and may help restore the balance of gut bacteria.

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or SED rate) is a blood test that indirectly measures the degree of inflammation in the body. It is often used as a marker to assess the activity and severity of ulcerative colitis.

Fistula is an abnormal connection or tunnel that forms between two organs, vessels, or intestines. In the context of ulcerative colitis, fistulas can develop between the colon and other structures, leading to pain, discomfort, and the risk of infection.

A biopsy is a procedure in which a small sample of tissue is taken for examination under a microscope. In the case of ulcerative colitis, a biopsy of the colon or rectal lining may be performed to confirm the diagnosis or evaluate the extent of inflammation.

Aminosalicylates are a group of medications commonly used to treat inflammation of the gut, including inflammatory bowel disease. They work by reducing inflammation in the colon and preventing flare-ups in individuals with ulcerative colitis.

Back gas, also known as gas that backs up in a stoma pouch and causes it to expand, can be a common concern for individuals with a stoma resulting from surgery for ulcerative colitis. Managing gas production and ensuring proper pouch function are important for comfort and confidence.

Bacterial recolonization refers to the process of introducing beneficial bacteria back into the gut to restore a healthy balance. It can be used as a therapeutic approach to manage the symptoms of colitis and promote gut health.

Barium enema is an X-ray examination that helps doctors detect changes or abnormalities in the large intestine. During the procedure, a liquid containing barium is inserted into the rectum, and X-ray images are taken to visualize the colon's structure and identify any signs of inflammation or ulcers.

Bloating is the uncomfortable feeling of fullness and tightness in the abdomen caused by the accumulation of gas in the digestive system. Individuals with ulcerative colitis may experience bloating as a result of increased gas production.

Clenching up refers to squeezing the rectum together to prevent leakage of stool. It is a technique often used by individuals with ulcerative colitis to control bowel movements and avoid accidents.

Crohn's disease is another type of inflammatory bowel disease that can affect the entire digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. While similar to ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease can involve any part of the digestive system and may cause symptoms such as diarrhea, cramping, bloody stools, and ulcers.

Crohnie is a term used to refer to someone who has Crohn's disease. It can be used as a way to connect with others who share similar experiences and challenges.

Colectomy is a surgical procedure that involves partial or total removal of the large intestine (colon). In severe cases of ulcerative colitis that do not respond to other treatments, colectomy may be necessary to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life.

Colon, also known as the large intestine, is the final portion of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes from digested food, forming stool, and facilitating its elimination.

Colonoscopy is an essential diagnostic procedure used to evaluate the colon and rectum for any abnormalities or signs of inflammation. It involves inserting a long, flexible tube with a camera into the rectum to visualize the entire colon and obtain tissue samples for further examination.

Computed tomography (CT) scan is an imaging technique that uses X-rays and computer processing to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body's soft tissues and bones. CT scans can be useful in diagnosing and monitoring ulcerative colitis, providing valuable information about the extent of inflammation and identifying potential complications.

Constipation is a common symptom characterized by difficulty or infrequent bowel movements. It can occur in individuals with ulcerative colitis, especially during flare-ups or when the inflammation affects the rectum.

Digital rectal exam is a medical procedure in which a healthcare provider examines the rectum by inserting a gloved, lubricated finger to check for signs of Piles, polyps, tumors, or other abnormalities. It can be a part of routine check-ups or used to assess the severity of inflammation in individuals with ulcerative colitis.

Distal colitis refers to a form of ulcerative colitis that primarily affects the rectum and extends up to the mid-portion of the descending colon, which is also known as the left colon. It is important to differentiate between different types of colitis to determine the appropriate treatment approach.

Diverticulitis is a common condition of the digestive system that occurs when small pouches called diverticula in the colon become inflamed or infected. While diverticulitis is not directly related to ulcerative colitis, individuals with ulcerative colitis may be more prone to developing diverticulosis, the presence of diverticula without inflammation.

Diverticulum refers to an outpouching or a small sac-like structure that can develop in the wall of the colon. Diverticula are common in the general population and usually do not cause any symptoms unless they become inflamed or infected, leading to diverticulitis.

Endoscopy is a diagnostic procedure that allows healthcare providers to examine the internal organs and structures of the digestive system using an endoscope, a long, flexible tube with a light and camera. Endoscopy plays a crucial role in the evaluation and management of ulcerative colitis by providing direct visualization and the ability to obtain biopsies if needed.

Flare or flare-up refers to the sudden and often unpredictable worsening of symptoms in individuals with ulcerative colitis. Flares can be characterized by increased inflammation, abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and other gastrointestinal symptoms. Managing flares is a key aspect of ulcerative colitis treatment.

Flexible sigmoidoscopy is a procedure similar to colonoscopy but focuses on examining the rectum and the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon). It allows healthcare providers to visualize and evaluate the extent of inflammation in individuals with ulcerative colitis.

Gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex organ system responsible for the digestion, absorption, and elimination of food. It includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), rectum, and anus. Ulcerative colitis specifically affects the colon and rectum within the GI tract.

Pilesare swollen and inflamed veins in the rectum and around the anus. While not directly related to ulcerative colitis, individuals with ulcerative colitis may experience Pilesas a result of increased straining during bowel movements or inflammation in the anal area.

"Wet fart" and "shart" are slang terms used to describe passing gas with the presence of solid waste. They are sometimes used humorously to refer to accidental bowel movements or the inability to control gas or stool effectively. While these terms may be ligh the the intestine, particularly the colon and rectum, is responsible for the absorption of nutrients and the elimination of waste. When ulcerative colitis affects this vital part of the digestive system, it can disrupt the normal functioning of the intestines and lead to a range of uncomfortable symptoms.

Remission is a term used to describe a period when ulcerative colitis symptoms are under control or absent. During remission, the disease is less active, and individuals can experience a significant reduction in symptoms and improved overall well-being. Achieving and maintaining remission is a primary goal of ulcerative colitis treatment.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic technique that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of the body's soft tissues and bones. It can provide valuable information about the extent and severity of inflammation in individuals with ulcerative colitis and help guide treatment decisions.

The rectum is the lower section of the large intestine, located just above the anus. It plays a crucial role in storing and eliminating stool from the body. In ulcerative colitis, inflammation of the rectum can cause symptoms such as rectal urgency, frequent bowel movements, and rectal bleeding.

Pan-ulcerative (total) colitis is a severe form of ulcerative colitis that affects the entire colon. It is characterized by extensive inflammation and ulceration throughout the colon, which can lead to serious complications such as massive bleeding and acute dilation of the colon. Prompt medical attention and treatment are necessary for managing pan-ulcerative colitis effectively.

Rectal urgency refers to the sudden and intense urge to have a bowel movement. Individuals with ulcerative colitis may experience this symptom frequently, often accompanied by abdominal cramping and an inability to delay or control the urge.

Polyps are abnormal growths that can develop in the lining of the intestines, including the colon. While most polyps are noncancerous, some can become precancerous or cancerous over time. Regular monitoring and removal of polyps during colonoscopy are important for individuals with ulcerative colitis to reduce the risk of complications.

Proctitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the lining of the rectum. It can occur in isolation or as a part of ulcerative colitis. Symptoms may include rectal pain, bleeding, and increased frequency of bowel movements.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeast that can provide health benefits when consumed in adequate amounts. They are believed to help restore the balance of good bacteria in the gut and may be beneficial for individuals with ulcerative colitis. Probiotics can be found in certain foods like yogurt and kefir or taken as supplements.

As we explore the language and terminology associated with ulcerative colitis, it becomes evident that managing this chronic condition requires a comprehensive understanding of its various aspects. From the immune system's involvement to diagnostic procedures like colonoscopy and the impact on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract, such knowledge empowers individuals to navigate their journey with ulcerative colitis more effectively.

It is crucial for individuals with ulcerative colitis to work closely with healthcare professionals who specialize in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. By staying informed about the condition, taking prescribed medications, adopting a healthy lifestyle, and seeking ongoing medical care, individuals can find strategies to manage symptoms, achieve remission, and improve their quality of life.

Remember, ulcerative colitis is a complex condition, and each person's experience may vary. By educating ourselves and promoting awareness, we can create a supportive environment for individuals living with ulcerative colitis and contribute to a better understanding of this challenging disease.

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