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5 Foods to Avoid with Kidney Disease and Diabetes

by Development PRT on 0 Comments

It's crucial to monitor your consumption of sugar and certain minerals, such salt and potassium, if you have diabetes and kidney disease. Items like processed meats, fruit juice, and potatoes should be consumed in moderation or avoided altogether. 

Your kidneys play a number of important roles in maintaining good health, including filtering your blood, getting rid of waste, making hormones, preserving your bones, and controlling blood pressure and fluid balance.

Your risk of kidney disease can be increased by a number of variables and medical conditions, including diabetes.

Your blood vessels, particularly those in your kidneys, may get damaged by persistently high blood sugar levels. As a result, kidney damage affects around 1 in 3 persons with diabetes.

Depending on the stage of kidney disease, dietary recommendations for people with diabetes typically call for limiting your consumption of sugar, salt, potassium, and phosphorus.

Since the kidneys may have trouble filtering waste products from protein metabolism, individuals with renal illness should also keep an eye on their protein consumption. Nevertheless, those with advanced renal disease could require extra protein.

Depending on your stage of renal disease, a medical specialist and a certified dietitian can advise you on your specific requirements for protein and other nutrients.

Here are 5 foods to restrict or stay away from if you have diabetes and renal problems.

Sodium 

People with renal disease and diabetes should avoid meals high in sodium since too much salt can strain your kidneys and produce high blood pressure and fluid retention.

Meats are dried, salted, cured, or smoked to improve their flavour, texture, and shelf life in processed meats like bacon, sausage, and jerky.

Because these items are often salted, they have a high sodium level, therefore if you have renal disease or diabetes, you should restrict your use of them.

Instant noodles, frozen pizza, fast food, and frozen dinners are further examples of processed foods with high salt content that should be avoided.

Phosphorus 

When you have renal illness, it is difficult for your kidneys to eliminate too much phosphorus from your blood.

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Long-term high blood phosphorus levels can increase your risk of heart disease, deteriorate your bones, and elevate your mortality risk.

Phosphorus is used in dark-colored sodas to add flavour, extend shelf life, and prevent discolouration. They do, however, contain a different kind of phosphorus than what is normally present in food, and this form is easier for your body to absorb.

Even though beans and lentils have a high phosphorus content, you can still eat them in moderation if you like them.

Indeed, some studies indicate that plant-based diets, which place a greater emphasis on legumes, whole grains, nuts, and seeds as sources of protein, may decrease the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Furthermore, phosphorus absorption varies depending on the source of the diet. Compared to up to 70% from animal sources, only 40%–50% of phosphorus is absorbed from plant sources. 

Potassium

As a result of improper potassium removal by the body due to renal illness, blood potassium levels may rise. It can result in exhaustion, weakened muscles, cardiac issues, and even death if addressed.

Bananas, avocados, apricots, kiwis, and oranges are examples of fruits high in potassium that a doctor might advise you to avoid if you have renal illness.

In order to maintain a kidney-friendly diet, several forms of leafy green vegetables, including spinach, chard and beetroot greens, may need to be consumed in moderation due to their high potassium content.

Potassium levels are high in both potatoes and sweet potatoes. However, their potassium concentration may be greatly reduced by soaking them or leaching them.

According to one research, soaking potatoes lowered their potassium content by up to 70% after boiling, resulting in potassium levels adequate for patients with renal disease.

Added sugar

It is advised to reduce your use of fruit juices and other sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, if you have diabetes and renal disease.

These beverages frequently include a lot of added sugar, which can quickly raise blood sugar levels. This is problematic because diabetes interferes with your body's capacity to effectively absorb sugar. 

Long-term high blood sugar levels can harm your kidneys, increase your risk of heart disease, and harm your nerves.

Baked products, candies, cookies, and doughnuts are some other foods rich in added sugar.

Alcohol

Large alcohol intake might have a harmful impact on renal health.

Alcohol can also interact negatively with several diabetic treatments, increasing the chance of problems like low blood sugar.

Therefore, if you have diabetes and renal illness, it's better to limit your alcohol consumption.

You may get advice on whether it's okay to include alcohol in your diet plan and how much you can drink from a healthcare practitioner.

Safe foods to eat with chronic kidney disease

If you have diabetes and kidney disease, a wide variety of foods can be incorporated into a healthy, balanced diet.

The following are a few examples of meals and beverages that the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recommend for patients with diabetes and renal disease

vegetables: cauliflower, onions, turnips, eggplants, and

Fruits: berries, apples, plums, cherries, and grapes

Proteins: low-sodium seafood, eggs, lean poultry and fish.

Carbohydrate: Pasta, sandwich bread, unsalted crackers, white bread, bagels, and other carbohydrates

Beverages: clear diet sodas, unsweetened tea, and water

You can also get suggestions for wholesome meals to put in your meal plan from a doctor or nutritionist. 

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